Aperture hates Flip

This window popped up when I installed the latest update to Aperture 3:

 

Screen Shot 2012-03-14 at 11.11.58

Destroy all 3ivx codecs

And sure enought, the linked support document tells you to purge that 3ivx codec from your system. Where did it come from? FlipShare.

And so the component is gone, and Aperture is noticably more responsive. And the legacy of that lovely little Flip cam fades a little more into the past…

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A photographic method and a career, in the rear view mirror

Scan-120109-0008

Portrait of the blogger as a young hack

I've been scanning again. One of my redundancy resolutions has been to use my sudden increase in available free time to catch up on some projects, including the digitisation of my own negatives and old family photos. 

The image to the right comes from a set of negatives I shot as a university student – probably in the spring of 1993, although exact dating is hard. I'm not quite sure who took the photo of me above – but I do know they took it with my camera.

The thing that has really struck me about this film in particular is how darn grainy it is. Honestly, I'm not sure if that's an inherent characteristic of the film – Ilford HP5 Plus – or some poor darkroom discipline on my part, effectively "push processing" shots that didn't need it. 

Or, am I now so used to using digital photography (which I've been doing since late 2001) that I've forgotten how much grain was an inherent quality of silver halide photos? I suspect the coming weeks of scanning will answer that question one way or another.

The other thought that occured to me was that, as these photos from the student magazine office remind me, I'm not involved in the production of a journalistic periodical in any way for the first time since probably 1987. School magazines, student newspapers, my professional journalistic career… It's been over two decades of continuous involvement brought to an abrupt end by redundancy.

And you know what? I'm amazed by how little it's affected me. Perhaps sometime in the last year I passed the point where I'm truly more a blogger – an online content afficicnado – than a journalist.

Where does that take me next?

On the rise of camera phones, and photo apps

Teru Kuwayama, a photojournalist, disagrees: “You could make an analogy to the advent of the electric guitar or electronic music. Much to the annoyance of classical musicians, those things made ‘everyone’ a musician. I grew up on punk rock, hip hop and death metal, so I welcome the post-classical age of photography, and the explosion of amateur expression that comes with it.

“Obviously, it sucks to be a professional photographer, and it's personally inconvenient to lose your pedestal and your livelihood to a $2 app, but that doesn't mean it's a bad thing for photography.”

via www.telegraph.co.uk

And just like with music, I'm sure we'll see new forms of photography emerging, because the technology for capturing AND sharing has become ever more accessible.